(509) 535-4932 'Oldest Meat Market in Town' serving Spokane, Washington, since 1891 Sonnenberg's Market & Deli

Food Safety

Keep Food Safe! Food Safety Basics

 

Safe steps in food handling, cooking, and storage are essential in preventing foodborne illness. You can't see, smell, or taste harmful bacteria that may cause illness. In every step of food preparation, follow the four Fight BAC!® guidelines to keep food safe:

  • Clean—Wash hands and surfaces often.
  • Separate—Don't cross-contaminate.
  • Cook—Cook to proper temperatures, checking with a food thermometer.
  • Chill—Refrigerate promptly.


Storage

  • Always refrigerate perishable food within 2 hours (1 hour when the temperature is above 90 °F).
  • Check the temperature of your refrigerator and freezer with an appliance thermometer. The refrigerator should be at 40 °F or below and the freezer at 0 °F or below.
  • Cook or freeze fresh poultry, fish, ground meats, and variety meats within 2 days; other beef, veal, lamb, or pork, within 3 to 5 days.
  • Perishable food such as meat and poultry should be wrapped securely to maintain quality and to prevent meat juices from getting onto other food.
  • To maintain quality when freezing meat and poultry in its original package, wrap the package again with foil or plastic wrap that is recommended for the freezer.
  • In general, high-acid canned food such as tomatoes, grapefruit, and pineapple can be stored unopened on the shelf for 12 to 18 months. Low-acid canned food such as meat, poultry, fish, and most vegetables will keep 2 to 5 years-if the unopened can remains in good condition and has been stored in a cool, clean, and dry place. Discard cans that are dented, leaking, bulging, or rusted.


Thawing

  • Refrigerator—The refrigerator allows slow, safe thawing. Make sure thawing meat and poultry juices do not drip onto other food.
  • Cold Water—For faster thawing, place food in a leak-proof plastic bag. Submerge in cold tap water. Change the water every 30 minutes. Cook immediately after thawing.
  • Microwave—Cook meat and poultry immediately after microwave thawing.


Preparation

  • Always wash hands with soap and warm water for 20 seconds before and after handling food.
  • Don't cross-contaminate. Keep raw meat, poultry, fish, and their juices away from other food. After cutting raw meats, wash cutting board, knife, and counter tops with hot, soapy water.
  • Marinate meat and poultry in a covered dish in the refrigerator.
  • Sanitize cutting boards by using a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach in 1 gallon of water.


Cooking
Cook foods to the recommended safe minimum internal temperatures listed below. Check temperatures with a food thermometer. Learn more about using food thermometers on the FSIS Web site or by calling the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline.
 

Cooking
Product Type Internal Temperature (°F)
Beef & Veal Ground 160
Steak and roasts medium 160
Steak and roasts medium rare 145
Chicken & Turkey Breasts 165
Ground, stuffing, and casseroles 165
Whole bird, legs, thighs, and wings 165
Eggs Any type 160
Fish & Shellfish Any type 145
Lamb Ground 160
Steak and roasts medium 160
Steaks and roasts medium rare 145
Leftovers Any type 165
Pork Chops, fresh (raw) ham ground, ribs, and roasts 160
Fully cooked ham (to reheat) 140


Serving

  • Hot food should be held at 140 °F or warmer.
  • Cold food should be held at 40 °F or colder.
  • When serving food at a buffet, keep hot food hot with chafing dishes, slow cookers, and warming trays. Keep cold food cold by nesting dishes in bowls of ice or use small serving trays and replace them often.
  • Use a food thermometer to check hot and cold holding temperatures.
  • Perishable food should not be left out more than 2 hours at room temperature (1 hour when the temperature is above 90 °F).